03 December 2016

Andrew Patrick Payne : Birth Record

A breakthrough in the Payne family tree


I've been trying to track down my grandfather's step-brothers and their descendants. It would be nice to know more about them. (If you're a member of the Payne family please get in touch. I have some photos that might be of your ancestors and I'd love for you to have them!)

Briefly, Thomas Payne, longtime boarder with the family of William and Mary (Klein) Dixon, was married and had at least two sons before he married my great-grandmother, Mary (Klein) Dixon. My grandfather told me some stories about his step-brothers, at least one of whom lived in the house with the Dixons. The stories may have involved the making of bathtub gin. Just saying.

You can read previous posts about Thomas Payne here:

Birth Certificate: Andrew Patrick Payne. Born 1 March 1905, Elizabeth, NJ. Parents: Thomas Payne and Mary Margaret McCudden.
Birth Certificate for Andrew Patrick Payne, 1 March 1905
New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.

Andrew Patrick Payne


Thanks to my NJ reasearcher, Debbie Hadley, I now have a copy of Andrew's birth certificate, AND I now know the name of his mother, Thomas Payne's first wife. As I said, a breakthrough!

It looks like Thomas married Mary Margaret McCudden when she was quite young. As she was 17 when their first son was born, it looks like she may have been 16 or 17 when they married. This helps me narrow down the marriage date to some time in 1904.

This document also confirms Thomas Payne's birth place as Dover, NJ. That is the location that he gives on his marriage certificate to Mary E. (Klein) Dixon. So two bits of agreement on that fact. His age here is listed as 28. His birth date is all over the place on the variety of documents that I have. His WWI draft registration gives 22 March 1876 as his birth date, so this information adds a little weight to that source.

Now there are a few more clues to follow. Hopefully I'll be able to find those Paynes! Stay tuned...

An Odd Coincidence

So, here's a bit of a thing. My grandfather, Wallace B. Dixon, was born one day after his future step-brother Andrew Payne, on 2 March 1905. They were practically twins!

Transcript

State of New Jersey. Bureau of Vital Statistics.
Certificate and Record of Birth [stamped 939]
Name of Child: Andrew Patrick Payne
Sex: Male. Color: White. Date of Birth: March 1 4:33 PM, 1905
Place of Birth: 67 E. Jersey St., Elizabeth, N.J.
Name of Father: Thomas Payne. Father's Birthplace: Dover, N.J.
Maiden Name of Mother: Mary Margaret McCudden. Mother's Birthpalce: Albany, N.Y.
Age of Father: 28 yrs. Occupation of Father: Ship builder.
Age of Mother: 17 yrs. Occupation of Mother: Housewife.
Number of Children in all by this marriage: 1. Number of Children now living: 1.
Name and P.O. Address of Professional Attendant in own handwriting:
Dr. John Keough
Date of Report: March 12, 121 Livingston St. Elizabeth, N.J.

Sources

New Jersey Vital Records, May 1, 1848 to December 31, 1915. NJSA microfilm roll 265 (Birth Certificates 1905: Nist, E. - Pisa), organized alphabetically by surname. New Jersey State Archives, Trenton. Andrew Patrick Payne, b. 1 March 1905. Certificate 939.

"United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZJ6-D9V : 12 December 2014), Thomas Payne, 1917-1918; citing Elizabeth City no 3, New Jersey, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,712,099.  

Marriage record for Thomas Payne and Mary Eliz. Klein. No. 11913, 20 April 1927. New York City Department of Records and Information Services, Municipal Archives, 31 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007.  

28 November 2016

Motoring Monday: 1949 Green Nash 4-Door Sedan

1949 Nash advertisement.
Image from Myn Transport Blog
which has afine article
about Nash automobiles.

"This is it! This is Nash!"

The 1949 Nash was the company's first postwar model, and was completely redesigned from previous edition. It's curvy uni-body construction led to it's nickname of "bathtub." Based on the serial number, Wallace B. Dixon's 1949 Nash was a "600" model, built in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which had the same basic body with a shorter front end than the more expensive "Ambassador" model. The average base price of the Nash 600 models was $1,877. The literature claims that the Nash '600' got over 25 miles per gallon at average highway speed. (1)

I have actual photos of my grandfather's own Nash parked in front of my grandparent's house at 1023 Thompson Ave. in Roselle. They moved into that house in 1952, so the Nash was still fairly new, and would continue to be a feature in that driveway for six more years after these photos were taken in 1953.

The green Nash 4-Door Sedan, parked in front of the Dixon home in 1953.

The Nash, smiling from it's driveway in front of the Dixon home. 1953.


Wally must have bought the Nash when it was brand spankin' new. I can see why he kept it for so long. Seriously, look at this beauty. And windshield wipers come standard! I wonder if he paid for the add-on turn signals. (1)

Standard equipment included:
  • cloth and vinyl interior trim
  • reclining front seats
  • rubber floor covering with front carpeted inserts
  • front door armrests
  • wind-up clock
  • dual sun visors
  • dual windshield wipers
  • stainless steel trim, molding and window surrounds
  • small hubcaps
 Custom add-ons:
  • electric clock
  • turn signals 
  • full wheel covers 
Here are a few more Nash photos from the Barrett-Jackson website, just to give you a some more views of a similar car.

A 1949 Nash '600' Four-Door Sedan. Oh, the grille of it all!
Image from barrett-jackson.com
A 1949 Nash '600' Four-Door Sedan.
Behold it's bath-tubby glory!
Image from barrett-jackson.com
A 1949 Nash '600' Four-Door Sedan. The round thing on top of the steering
wheel is the "Uniscope" - all your gauges in a single "pod." How spiffy is that?
Image from barrett-jackson.com

License and Registration, Please


1949 NJ Driver's License issued to W.B. Dixon.
If you care to look at the legal documents, you'll see that Wally hasn't changed much, though the look of the driver's license did. I'm including the images here just for form's sake.

1950 NJ Driver's License issued to W.B. Dixon.That amazing car had two homes, 214 Inslee Place in Elizabeth, and 1023 Thompson Avenue in Roselle. I'm sorry I don't have a registration to prove that, but the photos at the top of the page tell that story.

The Inslee Place address is right on "down the Port" and is a neighborhood that I remember from my childhood - going to pick up my grandmother from work at Singers, and Sunday Mass at Sts. Peter and Paul church.

1958 NJ Driver's License issued to W.B. Dixon.The house on Thompson Avenue was the first home that my grandparents owned, and it is, essentially, the place where I spent my childhood after school, on weekends, and during the summer. My mother and I lived just across the street.

The Nash was gone before I was born, and I'm grateful that I have some photos of it!

Sources

 Photographs of the Dixon home, Wallace B. Dixon Collection; privately held by Elizabeth Ackermann, [address for private use], 2016. Inherited by his daughter, Mary E. Dixon Traina, and then by her daughter, E. Ackermann.

New Jersey driver's licenses, auto registrations, Wallace B. Dixon Collection; privately held by Elizabeth Ackermann, [address for private use], 2016. Inherited by his daughter, Mary E. Dixon Traina, and then by her daughter, E. Ackermann.

1948 NJ Vehicle Registration for 1949 Nash Sedan owned by W.B. Dixon.
1949 NJ Vehicle Registration for 1949 Nash Sedan owned by W.B. Dixon.
1950 NJ Vehicle Registration for 1949 Nash Sedan owned by W.B. Dixon. 
(1) American Cars, 1946-1959: Every Model, Year by Year. J. Kelly Flory, Jr. McFarland. Viewed on Google Books;  21 November 2016. Pages 229-232.

1949 Nash Super 600. SMClassiccars.com : Classic Cars for Sale. http://smclassiccars.com/nash/46468-1949-nash-super-600.html ; accessed 21 November 2016.

"Nash Motors." Myn Transport Blog. http://myntransportblog.com  ; accessed 21 November 2016.



Images of driver's licenses and car registrations, as well as those of the Dixon home and vehicle are from my private collection. Happy to share, just ask.



 

21 November 2016

Motoring Monday : 1941 Chevrolet Coupe

Rolling right along...


From 1947 to 1948 Wallace B. Dixon owned a 1941 Chevrolet Coupe. I'm not sure which version of the Coupe it was, but I did find a nice photo of a Deluxe Business Coupe which, I trust, is fairly representative of my Grandfather's vehicle. [I'm not sure what would make a coupe "business" as opposed to "regular." If you know and would care to enlighten me, leave a comment1"]

A nicely restored 1941 Chevrolet Deluxe Business Coupe.
Image from Wikimedia Commons, under Creative Commons usage license.
Details here.

License and Registration


As we can see by the 1947 New Jersey Passenger Vehicle Registration, Wallace B. Dixon's car was a black six-cylinder coupe.

From the Registration and from the Driver's Licenses we can see that the Wally had returned from Florida and was living back "down the Port" on Inslee Place.







09 November 2016

Captain Kidd's Treasures

Dixons in the News

I've been having way too much fun with the Elizabeth Daily Journal digital collection from the Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library. Here's a series of stories featuring Alexander, Harvey, and William H. Dixon. Are they related to me? Possibly, though I've yet to find the connection. In any case they must have been known to my Dixons. Occupation [oystermen] and location [Elizabeth Port] all make it very likely.

Enjoy!

Wednesday, 22 May 1872

Captain Kidd’s Treasures (1)


UNUSUAL COMMOTION AT THE PORT — NEARLY A HUNDRED PIECES OF SILVER FOUND IN THE SOUND —THE OYSTERMEN NEARLY WILD

This morning the Port was alive with an excitement, the like of which has not so stirred it for many a day. For once the quiet locality is bristling with news and every one has something to say about the great event which has just taken place. Scarcely a question is asked except about the wonderful discovery yesterday, and the fishermen, oyster men, and owners of boats of any kind are almost wild over it.

A few days ago it will be remembered, a man named Jerry Van Pelt was dredging about the sound in the vicinity of the brickyard, when in hauling in his rakes he was surprised to find three Spanish dollars in them. His good luck was soon noised abroad and created quite a little excitement among the fishermen, and much speculation was indulged in as to how these coins came to be in that locality.

The old story of 
    CAPTAIN KIDD AND THE PIRATE
and of his buried treasure was the only one that in any way accounted for the strange discovery, and to this same generous Kidd, who seems to have strewn the coast from Maine to Florida with silver and gold, the most of which yet remains for lucky finders, was attributed the goodness of having placed those three Spanish dollars in the Sound.

But though Van Pelt was the first in luck he was not the greatest. His own efforts to secure more of the 
SOLID COIN
were not so successful as those of his fellow oystermen. Since the day he found the money, every oysterman has plied his vocation with special assiduity, and a particular liking for the oysters that grew just off the brick yard. Yesterday the perseverance was rewarded.

Alex. Dickson, Harvey Dickson and William H. Dickson, [Dixon] three brothers, determined in fraternal union to search for the buried treasure. Yesterday morning they got out their boat, pulled down to the docks at the brickyard, anchored out at a short distance from the shore and commenced dredging. They must have hit upon the
EXACT LOCALITY
of Kidd’s or someone else’s treasures. For three hours they worked as men seldom worked before, and in that time they drew out
EIGHTY SILVER DOLLARS.
Alec was most fortunate. He secured sixty pieces, while Harvey and William got respectively thirteen and five. They then came away; there seeming to be no other luck in store for them.

THE MONEY
is partly in good preservation, and the figures and inscriptions are quite plain to read. Most of it, however, is battered and beaten till the pieces are hardly recognizable as money. The largest pieces seem to be Spanish dollars. One of them is dated 1604, others have later dates upon them.

The query is, how did they get in the water? This cannot be answered but by the hypothesis already explained. The finding of the money has caused the greatest excitement, and all who own boats and can fish will probably be after the remainder of the silver.

A CHEST FULL
of coins of the same or greater value is supposed to buried somewhere in the Sound and a thorough search will no doubt be instituted for it.
 
 
 
Thursday, 23 May 1872

The Captain Kidd Treasure. (2)

MORE SILVER FOUND IN THE SOUND — THE DIXON BROTHERS AGAIN LUCKY — WHERE IS ALL THIS TO END?

The excitement created by the finding of eighty pieces of silver in the sound, has become almost a mania among some of the oystermen. Yesterday the Dixon brothers had their wonderful luck supplemented by finding thirty one pieces more, and this morning the fortune seekers are more numerous than ever.

“There’s a kind of a hole," said one of the Dixon’s to our reporter this morning, “and right down in the bottom of this is the silver.”

“Do you think there’s more of it in that place?” he was asked.

“Do I think there’s more? I just do, and I’m going to get these tongs fixed if I can get any one to do it for me.”

THERE’S LOTS OF IT IN THAT HOLE.

He showed a fine pair of oyster-tongs, about 18 or 14 feet long and the jaws about four feet in length. They could have cost but little less than ten dollars.

“The hole,” he continued, “is only about three feet wide and my tongs are too big to go down in it. I’m going to have them cut off so that I can get them down.” And he dashed away down toward a blacksmith’s shop, as though he was going to have it done in a minute, and as though he feared some one with shorter tongs would get the silver before he did. It is altogether probable that he will haul up a whole chest when the tongs get fixed so that they can go deep enough into that hole. It might be worth while to dive first and see what its there. There is only eleven feet of water at dead low tide and if there is plenty of silver, then let the diver come up and dig for it with the tongs again.

But where, if this good luck continues to the Dixon brothers, is all this to end. Besides having got so may pieces of silver they pulled up a pair of 

GOLD SPECTACLES
minus only the glasses. This certainly looks as if there were many more articles in the water, and it is hardly to be wondered that they work day and night to secure these other yet hidden treasures. But the question comes back, If all the oystermen go to hunting for silver what will we do for oysters?



Friday, 24 May 1872

The Kidd Treasury (3)

GOLD AT LAST — THE DIXONS AGAIN FORTUNATE — OTHER COINS FOUND IN OTHER LOCALITIES — THE NUMISMATOGISTS ELYSIUM.

At last the yellow metal has been found, the pure, solid, undoubted gold. and the Dixon brothers, on whom of late Fortune has not only smiled but “snickered right out," are again the lucky possessors of treasure trove. Yesterday they had their tongs fixed and re-commenced their search with renewed activity, zeal and vigor. Their success, how ever was hardly commensurate to their labor, unless this

PIECE OF GOLD
should turn out to be of greater value than its weight in gold. 

All day yesterday the brothers Billy and Harvey toiled tediously at the oyster tongs, but their labors were rewarded only by six pieces of silver and the one of more precious metal. This last is said to be, by those who know, nothing else than pure gold. It is rather small in size, compared with the “cob” dollars among which it was found, being only about three-quarters of an inch in diameter. The date is illegible, but there are some other letters and figures which are quite plain. The piece is not exactly round but has a small stem protruding form the edge. On one side of the coin near the top are the Roman characters VIII., and just below this is the figure 8. On the reverse side the letters P and R are the only ones legible. The coin weighs about half an ounce. Yesterday the Dixons took a number of their coins to New York and sold them to good advantage.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PIECES.

Among those shrewd enough to secure some of the most ancient of these relics, found by the Dixon brothers, was Robert McCloud. One of the pieces in his possession for which he has refused $25, bears the name and insignia of Pope Pius I. on it’s face, and the date of his reign. This piece is silver and about the size of a dime of our money. On another, the size of a silver dollar, the letters of the word Hispania can be discerned with the aid of a magnifying glass. Besides these are a Hebrew and Belgian coins, both of very ancient date. A special reporter of the New York Herald visited Mr. McCloud last night in company with an expert numismatist, who clearly demonstrated that the coins were of the ancient date stated above and tried very hard to purchase one of them, but without success.

ANOTHER CURIOUS COIN FOUND

It is now beginning to be believed that some time or other there was plenty of money in the Port — that probably some of the streets were experimentally paved with it and in taking the pavement up again some of the coins were lost. The reason for this belief is found in the fact that on Friday last Mr. P.J. Dwyer, who lives o the corner of First street and Magnolia avenue found a copper coin, worth as much perhaps as one of the Dixon’s silver dollars. He was digging a post hole and came across the coin, and after a good deal of trouble succeeded in cleaning it so that the inscriptions could be read. The coin bears the date of 1786, two years prior to the election of George Washington to the Presidency of these United States. Above the date are the figures of a plow augmented by a horse’s head, and around the edge of the coin are the words “Nova Caester.” On the opposite side is a large shield inside a circle formed of the words “ E Pluribus Unum.” Mr. Dwyer values his copper coin far beyond the price of a half dozen ordinary “Cob” dollars.

 
 
Saturday, 25 May 1872

Captain Kidd’s Treasury. (4)

The excitement about the money found in the Sound is beginning to die away. Yesterday, with all their exertions and labors, the Dixons were able to find only two pieces, and these of no very great value.

The report that the oystermen were going to petition Congress not to make an appropriation for dredging the Sound, and that they had begged permission to dredge it themselves for no other compensation than what they might find is, we are  authorized to say, entirely unfounded.



Monday, 27 May 1872

About Town. (5)

Sunday was about as perfect day as they ever make them.

Police officer Cave has a pistol bearing date 1812 — Capt. Kidd’s, no doubt.

The silver divers were at work yesterday, but without success.

T.W. Sloan has a cent that was melted on the top of a safe in the Chicago fire.

The spotted fever and the measles have broken out at 105 and 107 Elizabeth avenue. [George J. Cave, policeman, h 105 Elizabeth av] [Isaac D. Howard, carpenter, h 107 Elizabeth av]

etc. 
 

A few notes

That's all I've discovered about the Dixon brothers and their sunken treasure so far. Any updates will be added to this page, and noted as such.
 
The Sound referred to in the articles is the Long Island Sound.  

If you are related to this batch of Dixons, drop me a note or leave a comment. I'd love to hear from you. Are there any stories of sunken treasure and Spanish silver in your family lore?
 
 
Citations
 
(1) "Captain Kidd's Treasures." Elizabeth Daily Journal, Wednesday, 22 May 1872. Volume 2, Number 404.  Page 3, column 3. Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. Digital image, Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library, http://www.digifind-it.com/elizabeth/newspapers.php . Downloaded 6 November 2016. 
 
(2) "The Captain Kidd Treasure." Elizabeth Daily Journal. Elizabeth, Union County, NJ. Thursday, May 23, 1872. Volume 2, Number 405. Page 3, column 3. Downloaded from the Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library website; http://www.digifind-it.com/elizabeth/newspapers.php ; 6 November 2016. 
 
(3) "The Kidd Treasury." Elizabeth Daily Journal. Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. Friday, 24 May 1872; Volume 2, Number 406. Page 3, column 3. Downloaded from the Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library website; http://www.digifind-it.com/elizabeth/newspapers.php ; 6 November 2016. 
 
(4) "Captain Kidd's Treasury." Elizabeth Daily Journal. Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. Saturday, 25 May 1872; Volume 2, Number 407. Page 3, column 5. Downloaded from the Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library website; http://www.digifind-it.com/elizabeth/newspapers.php ; 6 November 2016.
 
(5) "About Town." Elizabeth Daily Journal. Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey. Monday, 27 May 1872; Volume 2, Number 408. Page 3, column 6. Downloaded from the Elizabeth (NJ) Public Library website; http://www.digifind-it.com/elizabeth/newspapers.php ; 6 November 2016.

15 September 2016

Thomas Payne : A Timeline

Here's what I know about Thomas Payne, his children, and his connection with the Dixon family so far.

1876 - 22 March. His 1918 Draft Registration says that Thomas Payne was born in NJ on this date. (1) 1875, 1878, and 1881 are also possible birth years based on other sources. (2, 3, 4) It's a little hard to pin down, but I'm going to go with the date on the Draft Registration since he provided that information himself. The marriage record for Thomas Payne and Mary Eliz. Klein says that Thomas was born in Dover, New Jersey to Patrick Payne and Catherine Gaskin. (3)

1900 - Thomas Payne is boarding with the family of William A. and Mary E. (Klein) Dixon. Age 25, Single, Oyster Dredger. (5)  

1900 - 1905 Probable date range for marriage of Thomas Payne to unknown wife.  

1905 - A family group sheet from a distant cousin gives March 1905 as Andrew Payne’s date of birth. This is confirmed by the 1905 NJ State Census. Thomas Payne, 28; Mary M. Payne, 17; and Andrew Payne, 0 are listed in the same household in Union County, New Jersey. (6) [a calculated birth year for Thomas Payne gives 1877, which makes this a likely match for "our" Thomas Payne.]  

1909 - A family group sheet from a distant cousin gives December 1909 as Thomas Payne’s [the younger] date of birth. [unconfirmed, no source given]  

1915 - A family group sheet from a distant cousin references the 1915 NJ State Census. Thomas Payne and his sons, Thomas and Andrew, are living in Elizabeth, New Jersey. No wife is included in the household. Thomas Jr.'s birth date is Nov 1909, Andrew's birth date is March 1905. (7) [The Family Search database record gives the birth date for Thomas Sr. as Sept. 1877. I have only seen the transcribed entry, not the original.]  

1918 - Sept. 12. Thomas Payne registers for draft. Contact person is Mary Payne, 159 West Grand, Elizabeth, NJ. (1) This is the address given by Mary E. (Klein) Dixon in the U.S. Census two years later. In that census she calls herself a "widow" although her husband was still living at the time. (8) [William Dixon is still listed in the household with Mary E. in the 1915 NJ State Census. (9)]  

1920 - Thomas Payne is boarding with the Dixons, as is his 9-year old son, Thomas [estimated birth year 1911]. 159 West Grand Street, Elizabeth, NJ. (8)
  • His age is given as 39, which would make his birth year 1881.
  • The census indicates that he is married. He is working as a dock builder.
  • Census info now gives his birth place as New Jersey and both his parents’  birthplace as Ireland.
  • Mary Dickson (Dixon) is listed as head of household, boarding house mistress, widowed, age 52. Thomas, Wallace, and Hazel Dickson (Dixon), Mary's children, are also in residence. No sign of Andrew Payne.

1927 - April 20th marriage record (NYC) gives Thomas Payne’s age as 49, calculated birth year 1878.(10)
  • Born in Dover, NJ to parents Patrick and Catherine (Gaskin) Payne.
  • This marriage to Mary E. Klein Dixon is his second. 
  • Both Mary E. and Thomas indicate that they are divorced.

1927 - May 23 : Mary E. (Klein) Payne's first husband, William A. Dixon, dies. His death certificate says he's married, to Elizabeth Kline, not divorced. (11) [The plot thickens?]  

1930 - Census records Thomas Payne's age as 59, giving a calculated birth year of 1871.(12)
  • Born in NJ. Father born in NJ, mother born in Ireland.
  • Gives age at first marriage as 22, calculated date for first marriage some time between 1897 and 1903. He is working as a dock builder.
  • A brother, John Payne, age 40, is now living with Thomas and Mary E. Payne. Calculated birth year 1890. He and his father born NJ, mother born Ireland.

1931 - Elizabeth City Directory (13) lists Thomas Payne at 125 West Grand, same address listed on 1927 marriage record.
  • Andrew P. Payne is in the same directory, with the same residence listed and “in U S Navy"

1935 - Elizabeth City Directory (14)
  • Andrew P. rem to California
  • Thomas Payne h 125 W Grand
  • Thomas Jr in US Navy r 125 W Grand

1938 - Mary E. Klein Dixon Payne dies on October 3 in Elizabeth, NJ at the home of her daughter. The 1938 obituary for Mary E. (Klein Dixon) Payne, Thomas Payne’s second wife, lists her surviving children as well as three surviving stepchildren: (15)
  • Andrew Payne of White Plains, NY
  • Thomas Payne of White Plains, NY
  • Mrs. Joseph Primiena of Elizabeth, NJ

Citations
(1) "United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZJ6-D9V : 12 December 2014), Thomas Payne, 1917-1918; citing Elizabeth City no 3, New Jersey, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,712,099.
(2) 1900 U.S. Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, Elizabeth, ED 102, sheet 7, dwelling 83, family 180, Thomas Payne.
(3Marriage record for Thomas Payne and Mary Eliz. Klein. No. 11913, 20 April 1927. New York City Department of Records and Information Services, Municipal Archives, 31 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007. Thomas Payne's place of birth is recorded as Dover, New Jersey. His age on this document if 49, giving a calculated birth year of 1878.
(4) "United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch. Mary E Dickson, Elizabeth City Ward 10, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing sheet 10A, NARA microfilm publication T625. Thomas Payne's age is given as 39, giving a calculated birth year of 1881.
(5) 1900 U.S. Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, 5th Ward, ED 102, Sheet Number 7, dwelling 83, family 180, William A. Dixon.
(6) "New Jersey State Census, 1905," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KMHV-P13 : 8 November 2014), Andrew P Payne in household of Thomas Payne, , Union, New Jersey, United States; citing p. 14, line 44, Department of State, Trenton; FHL microfilm 1,688,625.
(7) "New Jersey State Census, 1915", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV9W-WWXT : 8 October 2014), Thomas Payne in entry for Thomas Payne, 1915.
(8) "United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch.Mary E Dickson, Elizabeth City Ward 10, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing sheet 10A, NARA microfilm publication T625.
(9) "New Jersey State Census, 1915", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV9W-WW8H : accessed 15 February 2016), William Dixon, 1915.
(10 Marriage record for Thomas Payne and Mary Eliz. Klein. No. 11913, 20 April 1927. New York City Department of Records and Information Services, Municipal Archives, 31 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007. 
(11)William Dixon, death certificate No. 611 (23 May 1927), New Jersey Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Trenton, New Jersey.
(12) "United States Census, 1930", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X4F1-D1T : accessed 15 February 2016), Thomas Payne, 1930. ED 61, sheet 7B; household 166. Citing The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. GS Film Number 2341121, digital folder 004951973, image number 00896.
(13) Elizabeth Directory 1931 (Newark, New Jersey: Price & Lee Co., 1931), 578-579, Andrew P Payne and Thomas Payne; digital image, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 15 August 2016), Image 299 of 612.
(14) Elizabeth Directory 1935 (Newark, New Jersey: Price & Lee Co., 1935), 523, image 266 of 531, "Andrew P rem to California"; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 15 August 2016).
(15) Mrs. Thomas Payne, obituary, Elizabeth Daily Journal, Elizabeth, New Jersey, 3 October 1938, microfilm image, Elizabeth Daily Journal 30 Sep. 1938 - 12 Nov. 1938, Elizabeth Public Library, Elizabeth, New Jersey.. Obituary for Mary Elizabeth [Klein Dixon] Payne.

12 September 2016

Motoring Monday : 1933 Pontiac Coupe


The 1933 Pontiac Straight Eight Standard Coupe.
From a newspaper advertisement. Original source unknown.

The 1933 Pontiac Coupe was the Dixon family car between 1942 and 1945.(1)  My goodness, Gramps did like the sporty cars! This is another two-seater, but I believe it may have come with a rumble seat. The car Wallace B. Dixon purchased was likely well broken in since it had been on the road for nine years by the time he purchased it. Still, it's quite a looker!

Since this was the family car while my mother was in high school, I wonder if she ever got to drive it.

License and Registration (2)

The only registration that I have for this vehicle tells us that the car was a green Pontiac Coupe with an 8-cylinder engine. It also shows a new family address : 763 South Broad Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey.

This 1942 NJ Vehicle Registration gives the particulars of the 1933 Pontiac Coupe owned by Wallace B. Dixon. Privately held by his granddaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.
1942 NJ Vehicle Registration for the
1933 Pontiac Coupe.

The driver's licenses for 1942 and 1943 have the same residence. Also, they have reduced my grandfather's height to a much more realistic 5'5" from the 5'7" of previous years.

In 1942 the Dixon family was living at 763 South Broad St. in Elizabeth, NJ, as you can see from this Driver's License issued to Wallace B. Dixon in that year. Privately held by  his granddaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.
Wallace B. Dixon's 1942 NJ Auto Driver's License.

1943 NJ Driver's License issued to Wallace B. Dixon. Privately held by his granddaugther, E. Ackermann, 2016.
Wallace B. Dixon's 1943 NJ Auto Driver's License.

But then, in 1944 and 1954...

Hello Miami!

For at least part of World War II the Wallace B. and Sophie (Karvoius) Dixon lived in Miami. Or at least I'm assuming Sophie was there as well. But perhaps not, with a daughter in her last years of high school.

I knew that my grandparents had spent a good bit of time in Florida, but I had assumed it had been for my Grandfather's health. He had contracted emphysema while working in a soap factory (or so I believe he told me) and I'm sure the warm winter air in Florida would have been beneficial for him.

This new evidence makes it look like he was working while in Miami, as an "inspector" of some sort. Since he had a long career with Standard Oil, I wonder if he worked for them in some capacity. More research is certainly required!

In any case, according to these documents, he was issued a Florida Driver's License on 13 March 1944, at which time he was living at 340 NE 17th Terrace, Miami, Dade County, Florida.  On 28 September 1944 he renewed that license for 1945.


In 1944, Wallace B. Dixon moved from Elizabeth, NJ to Miami, Florida to work as an "inspector" of some sort. His Florida driver's license, pictured here, tells at least part of the tale. Privately held by his granddaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.
1944 Florida Driver's License issued to Wallace B. Dixon.
Privately held by E. Ackermann, 2016.

In 1945 Walace B. Dixon was living in Miami, Florida and working as an "inspector" of some sort. This was his driver's license issued by the State of Florida. Privately held by his granddaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.
1945 Florida Driver's License issued to Wallace B. Dixon.
Privately held by E. Ackermann, 2016.


 So now I have some Florida research to do. I know there are photos somewhere of the Dixons in Florida. Stay tuned!

Sources
(1) Wallace B. Dixon, handwritten note listing all the cars he owned and home addresses. Wallace B. Dixon Collection, privately held by his grandaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.

(2) New Jersey driver's licenses from 1926, 1928, 1929, Wallace B. Dixon Collection; privately held by Elizabeth Ackermann, [address for private use], 2016. Inherited by his daughter, Mary E. Dixon Traina, and then by her daughter, E. Ackermann. 

08 September 2016

Who are the Children of Thomas Payne?

The 1938 obituary (1) for Mary E. (Klein Dixon) Payne, Thomas Payne’s second wife, lists three surviving stepchildren:
  • Andrew Payne of White Plains, NY
  • Thomas Payne of White Plains, NY
  • Mrs. Joseph Primiena of Elizabeth, NJ
     
Andrew and Thomas Payne were also listed as bearers at the funeral in newspaper clipping about Mary E. Payne's funeral.(2)

My grandfather, Wallace B. Dixon, told stories about his stepbrothers. I don’t recall that he ever mentioned a step-sister, but perhaps she never lived with her father in the Dixon home.
Thomas Payne, Sr. and his son, Thomas Payne, Jr., are listed on the 1920 U.S. Census as boarding with the Mary E. (Klein) Dixon at 159 West Grand Street, Elizabeth, NJ. Thomas Jr. is 9 years of age at the time. (3) 

3 October 1938. Obituary for Mrs. Thomas Payne [Mary Elizabeth (Klein) (Dixon) Payne. Gives some life information and lists surviving family members including siblings, children, step-chilren.
Obituary for Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Payne.
Elizabeth Daily Journal, 3 October 1938. (1)

Newspaper clipping of the funeral held 6 October 1938 for Mrs. Mary Elizabeth (Klein) (Dixon) Payne. Services at Mount Zion Chapel. Burial at Evergreen Cemetery. Bearers were Harry Wimmer, Andrew and Thomas Payne, John Webster, Wallace Dixon and Milton Moore.
Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Payne.
Elizabeth Daily Journal, 6 October 1938. (2)


Things to Do

  • Look for Andrew and Thomas, Jr. in census records. Perhaps the sister will show up as well.
  • Try looking at city directories, both in Elizabeth and in White Plains, NY to see if either of the Payne boys show up.
  • Research Joseph Primiena of Elizabeth, NJ. Perhaps there will be information about his wife and her family somewhere. Check census records, city directories, etc.

 Citations
(1) "Mrs. Thomas Payne", obituary, Elizabeth Daily Journal, Elizabeth, New Jersey, 3 October 1938, microfilm image, Elizabeth Daily Journal 30 Sep. 1938 - 12 Nov. 1938, Elizabeth Public Library, Elizabeth, New Jersey.. Obituary for Mary Elizabeth [Klein Dixon] Payne. 
(2)  "Funeral of Mrs. Thomas Payne", Elizabeth Daily Journal, Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey, 6 October 1938, microfilm image, Elizabeth Daily Journal 30 Sep. 1938 - 12 Nov. 1938, Elizabeth Public Library, Elizabeth, New Jersey.. Article recounting details of funeral for Mary Elizabeth [Klein Dixon] Payne.
(3) "United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4YG-CQK : accessed 15 February 2016), Mary E Dickson, Elizabeth City Ward 10, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing sheet 10A, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,070. 

03 September 2016

Ralph E. Moore : Birth Record

Minnie Dixon's Second Son

Ralph E. Moore, c. 1945. Born 13 February 1909 in West New Brighton, Staten Island, NY. Cropped from larger photo. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
Ralph E. Moore c. 1945
Ralph E. Moore was born on 13 February 1909 at the home of his parents at 30 Barker Street, West New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. The house was a short distance from the north shore of the island. Across the narrow channel of the Arthur Kill is Bayonne, New Jersey. It appears that the original house at that address has been replaced with a more modern duplex, but if you look at the street view in Google Maps there are plenty of older homes on the block that can give some flavor of the neighborhood in the early 20th century.



Ralph, who came to be know as "Bucky," was the second son born to Minnie (Dixon) and Milton Moore. Minnie was the first child of Mary Elizabeth (Klein) and William A. Dixon, and was a native of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Milton, son of William and Sarah Moore, had been born in West New Brighton. He was employed as a "marine engineer."

Transcription of Birth Record


Ralph. E. Moore, born Feb. 13, 1909 in West New Brighton, Staten Island, NY to Minnie (Dixon) and Milton Moore. Minnie was the oldest daughter of Mary E. (Klein) and William A. Dixon.
Birth Certificate for Ralph E. Moore,
born 13 February 1909
Municipal Archives, New York City
The City of New York.
Department of Health.
State of New York.
Certificate and Record of Birth.
No. of Certificate, 436.

Name of Child: Ralph E. Moore
Sex: Male
Color: White
Date of Birth: Feb 13, 1909
Place of Birth, Street and No. : 30 Barker St., West Brighton
Father's Name: Milton Moore
Father's Residence: 30 Barker St.
Father's Birthplace: West New Brighton
Father's Age: 24
Father's Occupation: Marine Engineer
Mother's Name: Minnie E. Moore
Mother's Name before Marriage: Minne E. Dickson [Dixon]
Mother's Residence: 30 Barker St.
Mother's Birthplace: Elizabeth, N.J.
Mother's Age: 24
Number of previous Children: One
How many now living (in all): Two
Name and address of person making this report: F. C[?]ley, WNB
Date of Report: [blank]
[stamped received ? 5 1909]

Sources

Ralph E. Moore, birth certificate 436 (1909), Municipal Archives, New York City Department of Records and Information Services, New York, New York. 
Google, Google Map showing 30 Barker St., West New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. Copyright Google 2016. (https://goo.gl/maps/X1dcyxyjxMz : accessed and linked 2 September 2016).

01 September 2016

Looking for the Payne Family

Thomas Payne.
Second husband of Mary E. (Klein)(Dixon)
Cropped from original photo.
Privately held by E. Ackermann, 2016.

Ah, Thomas Payne. My step-great-grandfather is present in so much of my research, and yet he and his family remain strangely elusive. I've been spending some time focusing on the Payne family in the hopes of tracking down some descendants since I think I might have some photos that could be of the Payne clan.

If you happen to be a descendant or relative of Thomas Payne, please, please, please, get in touch!

Boarder, Husband, Step-Father


I can recall my grandfather, Wallace B. Dixon, talking about his step-brothers, though I don't recall that he ever mentioned them by name. Some of his stories involved the making of "bathtub gin," but I'm a little fuzzy on those details. And I remember my mother telling me about the house her grandmother [Mary Elizabeth (Klein) (Dixon) Payne] and Mr. Payne lived in, and how grand a place it was. Other than that, my personal knowledge is scanty.

At least I know what Thomas Payne looked like. How lucky I am to have a great portrait of he and my great-grandmother. The photo above is cropped from that image.

The story of Thomas Payne and the Dixon family is, at least partially, told through U.S. Census records.

1900 (1) - Thomas Payne, single, age 25 [b. March 1875 in this record] is living with the family of William A. and Mary E. (Klein) Dixon and their five children at 10 Fifth Street, Elizabeth, NJ. Thomas is working as an oyster dredger. At this time William A. Dixon has given up oystering as a profession and is working in a carpenter shop. However, his fifteen-year-old son, Willie, is working as an oyster culler. I can't be positive, but it seems likely that it was oysters that brought the Dixons and Thomas Payne together.

1910 - The Dixon family is missing from the U.S. Census for Elizabeth, NJ. At least I haven't been able to locate them!

1920 (2) - Thomas Payne is once again a boarder, this time in a household headed by Mary E. "Dickson" [Dixon] at 159 West Grand Street, Elizabeth. Mary lists herself as a boarding mistress working at home and on her own account. She is also listed as a widow. William A. Dixon is not in the household. [He doesn't die until 1927!] Thomas's age is listed as 39, which would be impossible if he was 25 in the 1900 census. The census taker records him as married, working as a dock builder for a contracting business. Also boarding in the household is Thomas Payne, age 9. I presume this is "our" Thomas Payne's son. Also living in the household are Mary's children, Thomas, Wallace [my grandfather], and Hazel, as well as two male and one female boarders. It must have been a big house!

1930 (3) - Thomas Payne is now head of the household at 125 West Grand Street. Mary E. is his wife. His age is given as 59, which makes him 20 years older than he was in 1920.  Mary's age is 62. I won't get into her numerous age issues here. Living in the household is Mary's youngest daughter, Hazel, who is listed with the surname Payne. Thomas's brother, John, is also there, as well as Mary's 93 year old father, John Klein. A very multi-generational household!

My great-grandmother, Mary Elizabeth (Klein) (Dixon) Payne dies on 3 October 1938 (4), and I loose track of Thomas after that. He's not in the 1940 U.S. Census for Elizabeth, NJ, so I assume he either died or moved elsewhere.

Questions, questions, and more questions!


  • When did Thomas go off and get married the first time? Who was his wife, and did they have any other children? My grandfather spoke of stepbrothers, plural, so Thomas must have had more than one son.
  • When did William A. Dixon leave the picture and why?
  • Where did Thomas Payne go after my grandmother died?
  • What became of Thomas Payne's children?


Citations

(1) 1900 U.S. Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, 5th Ward, enumeration district (ED) 102, Sheet Number 7, dwelling 83, family 180, William A. Dixon; digital image, downloaded 5 march 2015, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 5 March 2015); United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

(2) "United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4YG-CQK : accessed 15 February 2016), Mary E Dickson, Elizabeth City Ward 10, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing sheet 10A, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,070.  

(3) "United States Census, 1930", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X4F1-D1T : accessed 15 February 2016), Thomas Payne, 1930. ED 61, sheet 7B; household 166. Citing The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. GS Film Number 2341121, digital folder 004951973, image number 00896. 

(4) Mary E. Payne, death certificate. New Jersey Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Records, Trenton. NJSA microfilm roll 827 (Death Certificates 1938: Nason – Poz), organized alphabetically by surname. New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.

29 August 2016

Motoring Monday : 1928 Star Coupe

Most likely a Durant 1928 Star Coupe, or darned close to it!
From the 1928 Star M2 Fact Sheet at DurantCars.net.

1933 - 1934 : Back to Durant


As far as I can tell, because it seems that nothing is straight-forward as far as the production information of vintage automobiles, the car owned during the years 1933-1934 by Wallace B. Dixon(1) looked something like the image on the left. You can see lots of pictures of a modern restoration  of a 1928 Star Coupe at the Texas Transportation Museum website.

It certainly makes a change from the huge family-sized cars that my grandfather owned in previous years. I guess the kids rode in the trunk.

The Star Line


Wikipedia image.
Public Domain.
We covered the Durant Motor Company in a previous post featuring my grandfather's 1923 Durant Touring Car. I will just add a few comments about the Star. This Durant line was intended to compete with the Ford Model T. According to this Wikipedia article, it was in production from 1922 to 1928. The six-cylinder engine was first offered in 1926. Prior to that the Star line featured a four-cylinder engine. Star vehicles were produced in several Durant assembly plants around the country, including the one in Elizabeth, New Jersey. The serial number on the Vehicle Registration is missing the letter code that would indicate where this car was assembled. Too bad. It would be very cool if it had been made in Elizabeth!


License and Registration


1933 New Jersey Auto Driver's License issued to
Wallace B. Dixon. Privately held by E. Ackermann.
As you can see on the 1933 Auto Driver's License and the 1933 Passenger Vehicle Registration, the family is living at 239 Marshall Street in Elizabeth, New Jersey, the site of Wally's Confectionary. My grandfather was 27 years old when the license was issued. It looks like he's put on about ten pounds since his 1930 Driver's License was issued, but he's still standing tall at five feet, seven inches. (2)

1933 New Jersey Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to
Wallace B. Dixon. Privately held by E. Ackermann.
Resources


Citations
  (1) Wallace B. Dixon, handwritten note listing all the cars he owned and home addresses. Wallace B. Dixon Collection, privately held by his grandaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.

(2) New Jersey driver's licenses from 1926, 1928, 1929, Wallace B. Dixon Collection; privately held by Elizabeth Ackermann, [address for private use], 2016. Inherited by his daughter, Mary E. Dixon Traina, and then by her daughter, E. Ackermann. 
 

22 August 2016

Motoring Monday : 1926 Overland Coach

This might be the 1926 Overland Coach owned by Wallace B. Dixon. This photo is from his collection, privately held by E. Ackermann. The image has been cropped, removing a cottage and two unidenified people. 2016.
This might be that car! From illustrations I've found on line, it's pretty darn
close to what the 1926 Overland looked like. This is cropped from a photo
that may be of the Payne family country cottage. Wallace B. Dixon Collection
privately held by his granddaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.
From 1929 to 1934 Wallace B. Dixon owned a 1926 Overland Coach, Model 93.(1)  I wasn't able to find any illustrations of that specific model that were free from copyright restrictions. If you follow this link you will see a 1926 Overland Model 93 Coach from the Willys-Overland-Knight Registry website.(2) It's a pretty spiffy looking car. The photo here may be of that car.

If you happen to be a vintage car buff and can help me out with an illustration for this post, I'd be grateful!

Here's a list of the Overland's fine features according to a 1926 advertisement:
“With bigger, wider doors, more inside room, longer, higher windows, rich Baker Velour upholstery, a longer wheelbase,…one-piece windshield, Sun-visor, windshield wiper, Fisk full-size balloon tires, …this car is a phenomenal buy.”(3)

The Willys-Overland Motor Company

From 1912 to 1918 the Willys-Overland Motor Company was kind of a big deal. Only Ford produced more automobiles in the United States. In 1919, John Willys expanded the company with the purchase of the former Duesenberg Motors Plant in Elizabeth, New Jersey. The effects of the Great Depression forced Willys to sell that plant to William Durant.(4) We've covered that in a previous post.

It was during World War II that the Willys-Overland Company achieved lasting fame. Under U.S. Government contract, the company began manufacturing the Willys MB, better know as the Jeep. (4)

You can read more about the history of the company in this Wikipedia article.

License and Registration, Please


1930 NJ Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to Wallace B. Dixon for his 1926 Overland Coach. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
1930 New Jersey Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to
Wallace B. Dixon for a 1929 Overland Coach
Privately held by E. Ackermann, his granddaughter.
As you can see from the 1930 Passenger Vehicle Registration, this 1926 Willys-Overland Coach was a six-cylinder vehicle that had a 22 horsepower engine.(5) It appears to be another roomy vehicle suitable for a young family. During the time when my grandfather owned this car, his family lived at 239 Marshall Street. This is also the location of Wally's Confectionery, the candy store he owned, and according to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, the place where my grandmother, Sophie (Karvoius) Dixon, worked as a "saleslady."(6)

1930 NJ Auto Driver's License issued to Wallace B. Dixon for his 1926 Overland Coach. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
1930 New Jersey Passenger Auto Driver's License
issued to Wallace B. Dixon.
Privately held by E. Ackermann, his granddaughter.
Wally Dixon's Auto Driver's License confirms the address. The personal details on this license are interesting, to me anyway. The 1930 license shows that Gramps gained five pounds since 1929, and he grew three inches! It seems incredible to me that he was ever 5'7" tall.(7) In examining the full collection of driver's licenses, I see that he remained at this towering height until 1938, when he dropped back to 5'5" tall. Did a change in fashion in men's shoes cause the ups and downs? Another thing we may never know.


 Extras

Here are a few links if you'd like to learn a little more about the Overland. I'm also including images of the other registrations just for the record. If you click on the images you can view them at a larger size.

1931 NJ Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to Wallace B. Dixon for his 1926 Overland Coach. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
1931 Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to
Wallace B. Dixon for a 1929 Overland Coach
Privately held by E. Ackermann, his granddaughter.

1932 NJ Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to Wallace B. Dixon for his 1926 Overland Coach. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
1932 Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to
Wallace B. Dixon for a 1929 Overland Coach
Privately held by E. Ackermann, his granddaughter.

1933 NJ Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to Wallace B. Dixon for his 1926 Overland Coach. Privately held by E. Ackemann, 2016.
1933 Passenger Vehicle Registration issued to
Wallace B. Dixon for a 1929 Overland Coach
Privately held by E. Ackermann, his granddaughter.

Post updated on 23 August 2016 to include photograph of car.

Citations
(1) Wallace B. Dixon, handwritten note listing all the cars he owned and addresses he lived at. Wallace B. Dixon Collection, privately held by his grandaughter, E. Ackermann, 2016.

(2) The Willys-Overland-Knight Registry, Willys-Overland-Knight Registry (http://www.wokr.org/ : accessed 20 August 2016), photo gallery.

(3) "No car in it's class has such power," advertisement, Wallace's Farmer, DesMoines, Illinois, 16 April 1926, page 9, Advertisement describing the Willys-Overland Six automobile; online images, Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (http://idnc.library.illinois.edu/ : viewed 20 August 2016); Willys-Overland, Inc.

(4) "Willys." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 27 Jul. 2016. Web. 20 Aug. 2016. 

(5)(7) New Jersey driver's licenses from 1926, 1928, 1929, Wallace B. Dixon Collection; privately held by Elizabeth Ackermann, [address for private use], 2016. Inherited by his daughter, Mary E. Dixon Traina, and then by her daughter, E. Ackermann.

(6) 1930 U.S. Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, Elizabeth, enumeration district (ED) 20-29, sheet 72A, dwelling 152, family 248, Wallis Dixon; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 27 March 2016); National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. T626.