22 February 2017

Everything was not just as it should be

When my grandfather, Wallace B. Dixon, was nineteen years old his mother filed for divorce from his father. The year was 1923, and, according to the divorce documents, William A. Dixon had deserted the family in September 1912. (1)

The divorce documents are decidedly one-sided, as William chose not to respond to the suit in any official manner. We only get his wife's side, but affidavits given by Mary Elizabeth (Klein) Dixon and others tell a story of an abusive husband who drank away the rent money, forcing the family to move frequently — often several times in a year. Mary Elizabeth says "My husband made so much disturbance and did not give me money to pay the rent, so I had to move."

Mary Elizabeth testifies "For two years before the desertion, I lived on Livingston Street, between First and Second Streets; Second Street, between Jersey Street and Fulton Street, from there to Marshall Street, between Second and Third Streets, and then to South Second Street, and from there to Elizabeth Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Streets."

In May of 1912 William deserted the family for the first time, out of fear that Mary Elizabeth would have him arrested again for abusing her. He was gone for three months. Returning to the family, he "promised faithful to do what was right."

At the end of September 1912 William was drinking again. The family had been living on Elizabeth Avenue for a little over a month when a visit from the landlady prompted Mary Elizabeth to ask her husband for the rent money. According to her, William became abusive and told her to get the money herself, he did not care how she did it. Fearing further abuse, Mary Elizabeth went to her daughter Clara Viola (Dixon) O'Hare's house on Marshall Street and stayed the night. At that time she would have had three children aged eighteen and under – George Thomas, eighteen; Wallace, seven; and Hazel, three years old. Presumably she took them with her. My grandfather states in his testimony that he went to his sister Viola's house with his mother.

Q. Why did you go to your sister's.
A. I don't recollect now. Everything was not just as it should be.
Q. There was some trouble between your father and mother?
A. That had happened quite a few times.

Mary Elizabeth and her children stayed away from home until the following afternoon. "I then went back home and everything was gone, it was an empty house. The people downstairs said that he had sold some, and took some with him." Wallace adds "...there was a few odd pieces of furniture left; the house had practically been stripped."

According to Wallace, they went back to his sister's house for a few days, then moved to West Orange for a while before returning to Elizabeth. Mary Elizabeth petitioned the Overseer of the Poor, Mr. Sattler, to help her find her husband. The authorities did find him. They "ordered him to pay" and when he did not he was arrested and sent to jail for six months for failing to support his family. When he got out of jail he made a few meager payments to his wife, and then quit. Eventually the family learned that William had moved to Staten Island. Mary Elizabeth had to support herself and her children, going out to work and taking in boarders. Her son George Thomas was probably working by that time, and likely contributed to the family's support, as did my grandfather when he became old enough to work.

William A. Dixon with his two youngest children; Wallace Bernard Dixon and Hazel Dorothy Dixon. Circa 1920. Collection of E. Ackermann, 2017.
William A. Dixon with his two youngest children,
Wallace Bernard and Hazel Dorothy.
I believe this was taken around 1920.
Held by E. Ackemann, 2017.
At the time of the divorce William was living at 124 Grand View Avenue in Staten Island. He was employed as a carpenter at the Brewer Ship Yard, also in Staten Island. My grandfather testifies that he and his sister, Hazel, had made several visits to their father at his home there. So, presumably they maintained some sort of relationship with him.

On 29 May 1924 Mary Elizabeth was granted a divorce from her husband. She was given custody of Wallace and Hazel, and was granted permission to resume her maiden name.

On 20 April 1927 she married Thomas Payne(2), a long-time acquaintance and boarder with the Dixon family. Thomas had been a boarder with the family in 1900, prior to his first marriage.(3) By 1918 he was again living at the same address as Mary Elizabeth, 159 West Grand Street (4), and he and his youngest son were listed among several boarders in her household at that same address on the 1920 U.S. Census.(5) After their marriage the couple moved into a house that they owned, 125 West Grand Street, and for the first time in her life Mary Elizabeth had a home that she could truly call her own.(6) I would like to believe that they lived together happily until her death on 3 October 1938.(7)

William A. Dixon was living back in Elizabeth and was employed as a carpenter when he died on 23 May 1927, at the age of 64. I don't know who the informant was for his death certificate. That document records that at the time of death he was married to "Mary Kline".(8)

Sources

(1) Dixon, Mary E. vs. Dixon, William A., 25 July 1923, Chancery Court Records; Superior Court Records Management Center, Trenton, New Jersey; NJSA microfilm 2-23, file number C64-517, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton, New Jersey.

(2) Marriage record for Thomas Payne and Mary Eliz. Klein. No. 11913, 20 April 1927. The second marriage for both bride and groom, took place at the Municipal Building in Manhattan. New York City Department of Records and Information Services, Municipal Archives, 31 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007. Certified copy held by Elizabeth Ackermann, 2016.

(3) 1900 Federal Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, , ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed ); FHL microfilm: 1240996.

(4)"United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KZJ6-D9V : 12 December 2014), Thomas Payne, 1917-1918; citing Elizabeth City no 3, New Jersey, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,712,099.  

(5)"United States Census, 1920," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4YG-CQK : accessed 15 February 2016), Mary E Dickson, Elizabeth City Ward 10, Union, New Jersey, United States; citing sheet 10A, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,070. 

(6)"United States Census, 1930", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X4F1-D1T : accessed 15 February 2016), Thomas Payne, 1930. ED 61, sheet 7B; household 166. Citing The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. GS Film Number 2341121, digital folder 004951973, image number 00896.

(7) Mary E. Payne, death certificate. New Jersey Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Records, Trenton. NJSA microfilm roll 827 (Death Certificates 1938: Nason – Poz), organized alphabetically by surname. New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.

(8) William Dixon, death certificate No. 611 (23 May 1927), New Jersey Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Trenton, New Jersey. 

08 February 2017

Marshall Street Mystery : Conflicting Evidence

Sometimes you just wish your ancestors would give you a straight story, or that the documents you find might be deemed reliable.

I don't know that it's crucial, or even vaguely important, that I determine exactly where on Marshall Street my great-grandparents lived with their family. It is vexing that I can't find them in the 1910 U.S. Census, and I keep hoping that getting an address for them might lead me to a census record.

In two posts I wrote in May of 2016, I started to explore this problem. You can read them here:

54 Marshall Street
54 Marshall Street : A Room With a View?

Since then, I've found more information about the Dixon family during that time period. They moved quite often, and I'll write more about that in another blog post. Suffice it to say that William wasn't an ideal husband, and the family was often forced to move due to lack of rent money. (1)

Today I'm going to summarize the three pieces of conflicting information that I have regarding the family's address on Marshall Street in Elizabeth between the years 1909 and 1911.

City Directories


Both the 1909 and 1911 Elizabeth city directories list William A. Dixon, carp[enter] at 54 Marshall Street. (2,3)

There are actually two William A. Dixons listed in the directory, the other boards at 57 Butler. At that same address we find "boarding" Frank and Alexander Dixon, Jr. Also listed is Alexander Dixon, presumably the senior. Both Alexanders are oystermen, Frank and William are leatherworkers. This is clearly a different Dixon family.

Since my great-grandfather is known to have worked as a carpenter from around 1900, I believe that the Marshall Street William is mine. Additionally, there is another William Dixon, William H., boarding at 54 Marshall. My grandparents had a son named William, born in 1885. His middle initial was J according to his birth record, but I've also seen it recorded as C.

In the 1911 directory it appears that Alexander senior has died. His widow, Mary, is boarding at 161 Elizabeth Avenue. William the leatherworker and the junior Alexander are also now at this address.
Frank Dixon is not among the Dixon listings for this year.

Carpenter William A. and laborer William H. Dixon continue to be listed at 54 Marshall in 1911. And so I conclude that this is "my" William A. Dixon. One might also infer from this that they lived at 54 Marshall Street between at least the years 1909 and 1911.


Hazel Dixon's Birth Record


William & Mary (Klein) Dixon's youngest daughter, Hazel, was born 16 January 1909. You can read about her birth record in detail in an earlier post from February 2016. In that document the midwife, Therese M. Leyerer, records the place of birth as 65 "Marchal" Street. (4)

Neither the 1909 or 1911 directories have any listings in the street directory for a "Marchal" Street, leading me to conclude that she was spelling "Marshall" the way she pronounced it. Remember, this is the same document where William's occupation is "Carp Endor," actually "carpenter."

Additionally, the 1903 Sanborn Map for Marshall Street (5) shows that number 65 would have been located in the Pattern Storage building of the ship building company that occupied most of that side of the street. The ship building facility only increased in size over the years, by 1918 (6) it occupied nearly the entire block, so it seems unlikely that some time between 1903 and 1909 that a residence would have been located on that spot. Only those lots with even-numbered addresses on that block were residential. The same is true today. A comparison of the Sanborn maps and Google Maps for that street show that the numbering hasn't changed. 

Given the whimsical nature of the information in this document, or at least Mrs. Leyerer's interpretation of the information, I take the address with a grain of salt. Hazel may have been born on Marshall Street, but it seems unlikely that the address was number 65.

The Divorce Deposition


So, here we arrive at the heart of the matter. In 1924 Mary Elizabeth (Klein) Dixon petitioned for a divorce from her husband, William A. Dixon on the grounds of desertion. She claims that he left the family in September of 1912 and for the next twelve years provided no support for her or her children.

In Mary's deposition, she states:

For two years before the desertion [in September 1912], I lived on Livingston Street, between First and Second Streets; Second Street, between Jersey Street and Fulton Street, from there to Marshall Street, between Second and Third Streets, and then to South Second Street, and from there to Elizabeth Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Streets.

Please take a moment to process this. The family lived in at least five different locations in the two years between 1910 and 1912. Additionally, if they were living on the block between Second and Third Streets, the house numbers ran from 200 to 255 on the 1903 Sanborn Map.(7)  This is neither the 54 from the city directories or the 65 from the birth record.

So it seems that, at some point roughly between 1910 and 1912, the family did live on Marshall Street. Had they lived on Marshall Street more than once?

Conclusion...Confusion


I'm willing to accept as true that the family of William A. and Mary E. (Klein) Dixon did, at some point, live on Marshall Street in Elizabeth, New Jersey. I have three separate and unrelated documents that support that.

It is possible that they occupied a residence with the address of 54 Marshall Street, given the fact that it appears in both the 1909 and 1911 city directories. Supporting this is the listing in two city directories, and the fact that it was a residential address as indicated on both the 1903 and 1918 Sanborn insurance maps. However, they do not appear at that address in the 1910 U.S. Census, and given William's reported inability to come up with regular rent payments it seems a little bit unlikely that they lived at the same address for three consecutive years.

It is highly improbable that they resided at 65 Marshall Street, given the industrial nature of that side of the street. I don't consider Mrs. Leyerer to be a highly reliable source for any information other than the actual birth of the child. However, number 65 would have been in the same block as number 54. So there's that.

It is possible, given the nature of the testimony of Mary E. (Klein) Dixon under oath that the family did live in the 200 block of Marshall Street sometime around 1911-1912. One does have to keep in mind that the testimony was given about twelve years after the fact, and it is possible that with all of the moving the family apparently did Mary may have confused the exact location.

My conclusion is that the family did probably, at some point, live on Marshall Street. It is possible that they lived on Marshall Street two different times, once at number 54, and once in the 200 block. Is it vitally important that I know exactly when and where? At this point, I think not. It seems more important to acknowledge this as an exercise in examining conflicting evidence, and as a reminder that you can't always believe what you read.


Sources

(1) Dixon, Mary E. vs. Dixon, William A., 25 July 1923, Chancery Court Records; Superior Court Records Management Center, Trenton, New Jersey; NJSA microfilm 2-23, file number C64-517, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton, New Jersey.

(2) Elizabeth Directory 1909, Volume III. Newark, New Jersey: Price and Lee Company,  p. 193.  Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line: accessed 14 May 2016]. Image 101 of 417. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Entry for William A. Dixon.


(3) Elizabeth Directory 1911, Volume IV. Newark, New Jersey: Price and Lee Company,  p. 201. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line: accessed 14 May 2016]. Image 102 of 418. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Entry for William A. Dixon. 

(4) Hazel Dorothy L. Dixon, birth certificate 79 (16 January 1909), Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey New Jersey State Archives, Trenton, New Jersey. 

(5) Insurance Maps of Elizabeth, New Jersey. New York: Sanborn Map Company, 1903. Sheet 75.
Princeton University Library: Sanborn Maps of New Jersey: Elizabeth.

(6) Insurance Maps of Elizabeth, New Jersey. New York: Sanborn Map Company, 1918. Sheet 75.
Princeton University Library: Sanborn Maps of New Jersey: Elizabeth.


(7) Insurance Maps of Elizabeth, New Jersey. New York: Sanborn Map Company, 1903. Sheet 73.
Princeton University Library: Sanborn Maps of New Jersey: Elizabeth.

01 February 2017

I can beat that

Afternoon, Winter, Grandma and Grandpa's House



Classics - eggbeaters and that wallpaper. Making "eggnog" at my grandparents' house, early 1960's.
Me, early 1960's,
cooking up something good at Grandma & Grandpa's house.


Oh, that eggbeater. Did there ever exist a more fun kitchen utensil for a child? Some of you may be too young to remember eggbeaters, with their turning gears and whirling beater parts, and the cool sound they made.

Here is my Grandpa Dixon's recipe for "Egg Nog," which is probably what I'm in the process of making here.

  • 1 egg - raw
  • milk - enough to fill the glass
  • vanilla - a teaspoon
  • sugar - as much as it takes

Beat until frothy or until you get tired. Drink happily.

Yes, we ate raw eggs back then. I don't know anyone who ever got sick from it. And, I might add, it was pretty darned yummy.

This photo was taken in the early 1960's in my Dixon grandparents' kitchen. I loved that wallpaper! Still do. I know this was taken in the afternoon because the sun is shining in the front window, which faced pretty much due west, if I recall correctly. I know it's winter. Sweater and turtleneck weather. The box of tissues is a puzzle. Did I have the sniffles?

30 January 2017

Other People's Ancestors: George Wickham Metcalfe

Is this your great-grandad?


George Wickham Metcalfe, b. abt 1782, student of Columbia College, NY, civil engineer, married Edith Brownlow in TN 1896. Photo taken July 1893, Carr Studio, Athens, TN. Held by E. Ackermann, 2017.
G. W. Metcalfe, July 1893.
Carr photography studio, Athens, TN.
Held by E. Ackemann, 2017.
(click to enlarge)
I purchased this photo (1) in an antique shop in Virginia. I was drawn to it for several reasons. First, I like the looks of this fellow. Second, it not only had the photographers info, but a name and dates written on the back. I thought it would be easy to track this man down and maybe find his descendants so I could return the photo to them. If you are descendant of George Wickham Metcalfe, please get in touch!

The Photograph


The photograph was taken at the Carr studio in Athens, Tennessee. The following is inscribed on the back in pencil:
G. W. Metcalfe / July, 1893.  Feby 13/15-1894
The man appears to be in his early 20's, and is dressed in clothes that suggest an outdoor activity. The gaiters that he wears over his trousers are what make me think that, as well as the broad-brimmed hat.

I could find very little information on Carr photographers on the internet. City directories for Athens at that time period are not on-line, or are perhaps non-existent. The 1890 U.S. Census records for Tennessee were destroyed by fire in 1921.

The 1894 Knoxville Tennessee directory does have a listing for a G.W. Metcalfe, Civil Engineer/Surveyor. This was my starting point, and based on the evidence I have collected I do believe that this is "my" G. W. Metcalfe.

Timeline


Since I've found quite a bit of information for G.W. It seemed easier and more concise to put it in a timeline, rather than recreate my research process. I've created a tree for G.W. Metcalfe on Ancestry.com (G. W. Metcalfe Family Tree) to help collect information and to hopefully find some living family connections. You can view it there. If you want to see it, but can't access it, drop me a note and I'll send you an invite.

1872 or 1873 :  George Wickham Metcalfe born in New York, United States. (2,3,4)

1888 - 1891 : Student at Columbia College, New York, New York, Class of 1891. Member of Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity. George was active in athletics, participating in rowing and football. He was also a member of the Barnard Library Club and the Columbia College Shakespeare Club. (2,5,11)

1891 - 1899 : "George Washington Wickham Metcalfe. Knoxville, Tenn. Civil engineer; Resident Engineer of Wetmore, Polk Co., and of Embreville Iron Furnace, Washington Co., since 1891." (5)
The family of George and Adele Brownlow of Knoxville, TN. Daughters Edith, Mabel and Mary Louise. Photo from Ancestry.com, shared by S. Kear.
The Brownlow family:
George, Edith, Mabel, Mary Louise
and Adele (seated). c. 1894.
Photo Ancestry.com, S. Kear.
Permission pending.
(click to enlarge)

July 1893 : Photograph taken at Carr Studio in Athens, Tennessee. (1)

1894 - 1901 : G. W. Metcalfe, Civil Engineer, has a business address at 610 Gay S, 2d floor, Knoxville, Tennessee. (5,6)

1894 : Residence in Wetmore, Polk County, Tennessee (office in Knoxville) (6)

1895 : Boards at Hotel Imperial, Knoxville, Tennessee (6)

1896 : Marries Edith Brownlow in Knox County, Tennesee (7)

abt 1897 : George B. Metcalfe, son of G.W. and Edith, born in Tennesee. (8)

George B. Metcalfe
in his Junior year.
Member of Zeta Psi Fraternity
from the Blue and Gold 1919
Yearbook of the
University of California, Berkeley
(13)
abt 1901 : Stephen B. Metcalfe, son of G.W. and Edith, born in Tennessee. (8)

1900 - 1901 :  "Boards" at 608 Asylum Ave., Knoxville, Tennessee. (6) Residence is occupied by  Mrs. Adele Brownlow and her daughters, Mabel and Mary. (9)  I have not yet located G.W. in the 1900 census.

 1902 : No longer listed in Knoxville city directory.

4 May 1905 : John Brownlow Metcalfe, son of G.W. and Edith, born in Salt Lake County, Utah. (8, 10). G.W. is supervisor of a smelting operation.

1909 :  Living in West Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah.

1910 : George W. and Edith Brownlow, and their three sons are living in Delta Township, Shasta County, California. George is now manager of a smelting operation. (8)
Stephen B. Metcalfe
in his Sophomore year.
Member of Zeta Psi Fraternity
from the Blue and Gold 1919
Yearbook of the
University of California, Berkeley
(13)

1918 : George W. Metcalfe registers for the WWI Draft, 12 September 1918. The family is living in Tennett, Shasta County, California. George is "Manager, U.S.S. & M. Co." (14)

1920 : The Metcalfe family is living in Oakland Township, Alameda County, California. His two oldest sons are "university students."  The U.S. census from that year records George W. Metcalfe's occupation as mining engineer. His two oldest sons, George B. and Stephen B., ages 23 and 19 respectively, are university students.  John B., the youngest, is a high school student. (12)

If I happen upon any more information to add to this page I will. But for now I think I've devoted enough time and effort to Other People's Ancestors.

If you are descended from or related to George W. Metcalfe or his sons, please, please get in touch! I'd love to get that photo back to his family. If you are researching this family, feel free to use my research. I would be happy to send you a gedcom file or anything else that I have that might be of use to you.

And now, back to my own family tree!


Sources

(1) Photograph of G.W. Metcalfe

(2) The Columbiad '90, Twenty-sixth volume (The Junior Class of Columbia College, 1890), p. 57, img.73; p. 59, img. 75; p. 74, img 90; p. 75, img. 91; p. 76, img. 92; digital images, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017; clubs & sports participation, physical description, age given as 16. Calculated birth year 1873.

 (3) Utah, Salt Lake County Birth Records, 1890-1915," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXX9-JXF : 5 December 2014), George Wickham Metcalf in entry for John Brownlow Metcalf, 04 May 1905; citing Salt Lake, Utah, line 3347, Records Manager and Archive, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 4,121,066., p. 84, no. 3347. G.W. Metcalfe's age is listed as 33, calculated birth year 1872.

(4) 1910 U.S. Census, Shasta County, California, population schedule, , enumeration district (ED) 98, sheet 9B, dwelling 191, family 207, George W. Metcalfe; digital images, Ancestry.com (: downloaded 28 January 2017). G. W. Metcalfe age is 37, calculated birth year is 1873.

(5) Catalogue of the Alph Delta Phi (New York: The Executive Council of the Alph Delta Phi Fraternity, 1899), p. 875, img. 856; p. 75, img. 91; digital images, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017; locality index, chapter listing, shows G.W. Metcalfe as class of 1891. "George Washington Wickham Metcalfe. Knoxville, Tenn. Civil engineer; Resident Engineer of Wetmore, Polk Co., and of Embreville Iron Furnace, Washington Co., since 1891."

(6)  Knoxville, Tennesee, City Directory, 1894 (N.p.:n.p., 1894), p. 460, img. 243; p. 344, img. 181, Metcalfe, George W. civil eng; digital image, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : viewed 27 January 2017), Cites two pages, both listing Metcalfe as a civil engineer with an office on Gay St.

Knoxville City Directory. 1895. (Knoxville, TN: E.W. Crozier, 1895), p. 336, img. 180, Metclafe, George W.; digital image, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017), office and residence.

Knoxville city Directory. Volume XV. 1898. (N.p.: E. W. Crozier, 1898), p. 586, img. 290; p. 404, img. 206, Metcalfe, G. W.; digital image, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017).

Knoxville city Directory, Volume XVI. 1900 (Knoxville: E.W. Crozier, 1900), p. 391, img. 201; p. 554, img 284, Metcalfe George W; digital image, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017), residential and business listings.

The Directory Knoxville Tennessee 1901 (Knoxville, TN: E.W. Crozier, 1901), p. 428, img 222; p. 608, img. 313, Metcalfe George W; digital image, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017), residential and business listing.

Metcalfe does not appear in the 1902 Knoxville Directory.

(7) "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ47-RLC : 22 December 2016), George Wickham Metcalfe and Edith Brownlow, 08 Jun 1896; citing Knox, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. 144, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,020,963.

"Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ4F-BY9 : 22 December 2016), George Wickham Metcalfe and Edith Brownlow, 11 Jun 1896; citing Knox, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. 288, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,205,097.

(8) 1910 U.S. Census, Shasta County, California, population schedule, , enumeration district (ED) 98, sheet 9B, dwelling 191, family 207, George W. Metcalfe; digital images, Ancestry.com (: downloaded 28 January 2017).

(9) Knoxville city Directory, Volume XVI. 1900 (Knoxville: E.W. Crozier, 1900), p. 177-178, img. 91-92; Brownlow, Mrs. Adele, Miss Mabel, and Miss Mary; digital image, Ancestry.com (: accessed 27 January 2017), residential listing.

(10) "Utah, Salt Lake County Birth Records, 1890-1915," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXX9-JXF : 5 December 2014), George Wickham Metcalf in entry for John Brownlow Metcalf, 04 May 1905; citing Salt Lake, Utah, line 3347, Records Manager and Archive, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 4,121,066., p. 84, no. 3347.

(11)  Catalogue of the Alpha Delta Phi 1832-1909 (New York: The Executive Council of the Fraternity, 1909), pages 28, 439, 405; digital images, Google, Google Books (: accessed 28 January 2017; location listing p. 405. Note name appears as G. W. W. Metcalfe, or George Washington Wickham Metcalfe.

(12) 1920 U.S. Census, Alameda County, California, population schedule, Oakland Township, enumeration district (ED) 85, p. 138, dwelling 64, household 342, Metcalfe George; digital images, Ancestry.com (: downloaded 27 January 2017); NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.. Roll: T625_89; Image: 601.

 (13) 1920 Blue and Gold. A Record of the College Year Nineteen-Eighteen Nineteen-Nineteen, University of California. Published by the Junior Class: Berkeley, California; 1919. Hathi Trust; https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.b2961889?urlappend=%3Bseq=379. page 347, members of Zeta Psi fraternity. Listing by class year on p. 346.

1921 Blue and Gold. Being a record of the College Year published by the Junior Class of the University of California in the year 1920. University of California, Berkeley. Copyright 1920 by John W. Cline, Jr. and Charles Cost. Hathi Trust; https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.b2961890?urlappend=%3Bseq=331. p. 295. Skull and Keys membership.

(14) "U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," digital image, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 27 January 2017), George Wickham Metcalfe; Tennett, Shasta, California; serial No. 315, Order No. 1613; citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.








27 January 2017

Minnie Dixon and Milton Moore : Marriage Certificate

On Sunday, 30 September 1905, Minnie Elizabeth Dixon married Milton George Moore. (1)

Milton was 22 years old, and a resident of West New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. His parents were Sarah (Fullegar) and William Moore. (1) Milton was the oldest of four children. His siblings were Edith (b abt 1887), Charles (b abt 1893), and Percival "Percy" (b abt 1894). (2) At the time of his marriage to Minnie he indicated that his occupation was "chauffer." (1)

Minnie, also 22 years old, had been born and raised in Elizabeth, New Jersey. (1, 3) She was the oldest  child of Mary E. (Klein) and William A. Dixon. At the time of the wedding Minnie had six living siblings (two others had died as children), and in four more years her youngest sister, Hazel, would be born. (4) Minnie was living at 54 Marshall Street, Elizabeth, NJ at the time of her marriage. I assume this was the family home. (1)

The wedding ceremony was performed by the Rev. Henry Hale Sleeper, the Pastor of Grace Episcopal Church in Elizabeth. (1, 5) The witnesses were Anna Sleeper, the Reverend's wife, and  Frank Carberry, who's connection is unknown at this time. (1)


Certificate and Transcription


Marriage Certificate for Minnie E. Dixon and Milton G. Moore, 30 Sep 1905, Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey. NJ State Archives.
Marriage Certificate for Minnie Dixon and Milton Moore, 30 September 1905. (1)
New Jersey State Archives, NJ Vital Records.

State of New Jersey. Bureau of Vital Statistics. 399
Certificate and Record of Marriage.

Full Name of Husband: Milton George Moore
Maiden Name of Wife: Minnie Elizabeth Dixon
Place of Marriage: Elizabeth
Date of Marriage: September 30 1905
Groom's:
Residence: 137 Richmond Terrace. West New Brighton, Staten Island
Age: 22. Number of Marriage: One
Color: White
Occupation: Chauffeur
Birthplace: U.S.
Father's Name: William [R? or A?] Moore
Mother's Maiden Name: Sarah Fullegar

Bride's:
Residence: 54 Marshall St. Elizabeth, NJ
Age; 22. Number of Marriage: One
Color: white
Name, if a Widow: ---
Birthplace: U.S.
Father's Name: William A. Dixon
Mother's Maiden Name: Mary Elizabeth Klein

Witnesses: Frank H. Carberry, Anna E. Sleeper
Signature of person officiating and P.O. address: Henry Hale Sleeper, Elizabeth


Sources

(1) Milton George Moore and Minnie Elizabeth Dixon marriage certificate, (30 September 1905), New Jersey Vital Records, May 1, 1848 to December 31, 1915: microfilm roll 201 (Marriage Certificates 1905: Matt - Mule), organized alphabetically by surname of groom; New Jersey State Archive, Trenton, New Jersey.

(2) 1910 Federal, Richmond Borough, New York, pop. sch.; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed ); NARA microfilm publication T624_1072; Page: 10A.

(3) Unnamed [Blank] Dixon, birth certificate D40 (5 April 1884), New Jersey New Jersey State Archives, Trenton. Believed to be Minnie, as the date agrees with other documents.

(4) Compilation of information from a variety of sources too numerous to list here. Please see the page on this blog "Dixon Family Tree" for a list of names of the children. 

(5) Elizabeth Directory 1905 (Newark, New Jersey: The Price & Lee Company, 1905), page 463, Sleeper, Henry Hale, Rev.; digital image, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 20 November 2016), image 232 of 334. "Sleeper, Henry Hale Rev., pastor Grace Episcopal Church, h 225 E Jersey."

25 January 2017

Ida Dixon and Stephen Bruggy : Marriage Certificate

Ida Francis Dixon was the sister of William A. Dixon, my great-grandfather. They were the children of John Dixon and Isabella Porter. William was the couple's second child, Ida was their third. She was born on 12 June 1865 in Elizabethport [Elizabeth], Union County, New Jersey. (1)

Ida was 23 years old when she married Stephen L. Bruggy. At the time of their marriage he was 22 years old and employed as a boiler maker. (2) His place of birth on the Marriage Return is  Elizabethport, however, in the 1900 US Census Ireland is listed as his place of birth. It also records that he immigrated in 1872, around the age of 6. (3)

The couple was married on 31 March 1889 at 320 Franklin Street, Elizabeth, NJ. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. Madison Hare, pastor of East Baptist Church. (2) According to the Elizabeth City Directory for 1888-89, the Rev. Hare resided at 213 Elizabeth Avenue, but the church was at the corner of Third and Franklin streets. However, the same city directory shows that Theodore J. Woodring lived at 320 Franklin Street, so it appears that the wedding occurred in his home. [Connection to either family still to be discovered.] (4) My great-grandparents, William and Mary Elizabeth (Klein) Dixon were the witnesses at the wedding. (2)

Marriage Return and Transcription


Marriage Return for Stephen L. Bruggy and Ida F. Dixon
31 March 1889, Elizabeth, New Jersey
NJ State Archives, Trenton.(2)
[click image to enlarge]
State of New Jersey.
Marriage Return. [written in corner: B47]

1. Full Name of Husband: Stephen B. Bruggy
Place of Residence: 222 Bond Street
2. Age: 22 years. Number of his Marriage: First
3. Occupation: Boiler Maker. Country of Birth: Elizabethport, N.J.
4. Name of Father: Patric Bruggy. Country of Birth: Ireland.
5. Maiden Name of Mother: Eliza Grady. Country of Birth: Ireland.

1. Full Maiden Name of Wife: Ida Francis Dixon. Country of Birth: Elizabethport, N.J.
2. Place of Residence: 107 Elizabeth Ave.
3. Age, nearest birthday: 23. If in any trade or business, so state: [blank]
4. Last name, if a widow. Number of Bride's Marriage: First.
5. Name of Father: John Dixon. Country of Birth: Staten Island
6. Maiden name of Mother: Isabella Porter. Country of Birth: Ireland.
1. Date (in full) March 31, 1889. Place: 320 Franklin St. Elizabeth, N.J.
2. In presence of : W.A. Dixon, Mrs. W. A. Dixon.
3. Signature of Minister, (what Church Pastor of) or person officiating.
J. Madison Hare
Pastor, East Bapt. Ch.


Sources

(1) Ancestry.com. New Jersey, Births and Christenings Index, 1660-1931 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data:"New Jersey Births and Christenings, 1660-1931." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.

(2)  New Jersey Vital Records, May 1, 1848 to December 31, 1915. NJSA microfilm roll 64 (Marriage Certificates #384-83-A1 to #384-91-Z31), certificate #384-91-B47. New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.

(3) 1900 U.S. Census, Union County, New Jersey, population schedule, Elizabeth (City), enumeration district (ED) 99, Sheet A8, dwelling 111, family 155, Stephen Bruggy; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded 14 January 2017); Year: 1900; Census Place: Elizabeth Ward 4, Union, New Jersey; Roll: 995; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0099; FHL microfilm: 1240995.

(4)  Cook & Hall's Elizabeth City Directory for 1888-9 (Elizabeth, New Jersey: Cook & Hall, 1888), p. 151, p. 329,  p. 335, image 190 of 256, East Baptist Church; digital image, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : downloaded all three pages 14 January 2017), names Rev. J. Madison Hare as pastor, gives location of church [p 335]; Hare residence [p. 151]; Woodring address [p. 329].

20 January 2017

Hazel Dixon : Comptometer Operator

Working Woman

Hazel Dixon was, around the time of her first marriage to Harry Wimmer, employed as a clerk in an insurance offfice. (1) Whether she kept that job after their marriage in 1931 is unknown. It seems likely that after their divorce [date currently unknown] she went back to work, and was likely employed at the time of her second marriage, in 1946, to James Sullivan.

Comptometer Model WM
Turns out a Comptometer
is an adding machine.
By Ezrdr (Own work)
[Public domain],
via Wikimedia Commons
Hazel's obituary says this: "Prior to 1950, she was employed as a comptometer operator by Diehl Manufacturing Co., Finderne." (2) They made fans, among other things, and were the electronics division of Singer. [A very brief summary, and a nifty worker badge from the 1940's here.]

Was this her "wartime job" during World War II? Did she leave that work after marrying James? Every little bit of information leads to more questions!

International Sewing Machine Collectors International has a great article about Philip Diehl, founder of the company Hazel worked for. The guy was a genius. Seriously. A Great Diehl of Invention. [a bit random and off topic, I know, but really pretty interesting]


Sources

(1) "United States Census, 1930", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X4F1-D1T : accessed 15 February 2016), Thomas Payne, 1930. ED 61, sheet 7B; household 166. Citing The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. GS Film Number 2341121, digital folder 004951973, image number 00896.

(2) Hazel Dixon Sullivan obituary, Elizabeth Daily Journal, Elizabeth, New Jersey, 21 May 1957, laminated clippings. Obituary and funeral arrangements.